What kind of birth control can help regulate my period?

Question: I started birth control when I was around 15 to help with my extremely irregular period cycle, then my mom’s company chose to drop her health insurance (and mine) a few years later due to the Affordable Care Act. The price of my birth control skyrocketed so we couldn’t afford the pills anymore and I haven’t been on them for maybe a year or two. I am 20 now and my period has gone back to being extremely irregular; it didn’t come for months at a time and now it came and I’ve had it nonstop for two months so far (it’s still ongoing). I am not sexually active, nor have I ever been.

How would I go about getting back on birth control?

Would I need another vaginal exam (my doctor did one when I first started birth control)?

How much would it cost?

Also, is there any biological reason my period would be like this? I got my first period when I was 9 and it has always been irregular.

Answer:  It is normal for females under the age of 25 to experience an unpredictable menstrual cycle.  One advantage of using a combined hormonal contraceptive method, such as the pill, patch and ring, is the regulation of your menstrual cycle.  However, if you are not planning to become pregnant in the next year, a long acting birth control might be something for you to consider.  Both the Liletta and Mirena intrauterine device (IUD) offer 3-5 years of pregnancy prevention and a lot of women that use either the Liletta or Mirena experience no period at all, with exception of a light/spotty period once every couple of months.  Please call 352-0608 to make an appointment to discuss the variety of contraceptive methods with our staff.

Regulations involving pelvic exams have recently changed and females do not receive regular screening until they reach age 21.  However, if your last pelvic exam was abnormal or you have a history of any medical concerns, please let the staff know when you call to make an appointment.

The Family Planning Association of Northeast Ohio accepts private insurance, Medicaid or can set your cost using a sliding fee scale.  The clinic will ask you how much income your household brings in, how many people are living off of that income and asses the fee for your visit.  However, Family Planning can offer you services regardless of your ability to pay and accepts donations as well.

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