birth control

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Is break-thru-bleeding normal when I start or change my method of hormonal birth control?

Question:  I switched birth controls 3 months ago and now I had my period for almost 2 weeks mid pill cycle and now I am getting it every other day. It goes away then comes back. I don’t know what it is

Answer:  Break-thru-bleeding is nothing to worry about during the first three (3) months on the pill, if you change from one pill to another, if you miss a pill, or if you are late taking a pill.  If the bleeding lasts from more than 3 cycles, please call 440-352-0608 and make an appointment with the nurse.

How much does birth control cost?

Question: So yesterday, my boyfriends mother found out that we’ve begun having sex in our relationship. She thinks that it would be a good idea to visit family planning so that we can be safe. I’ll be 20 here in a couple months though and know that if I asked my father about anything sex related that he would flip. I do have his insurance card, however. So I guess my questions are;
-How much is birth control with or w/o insurance?
-If I made an appointment, what all would happen?
-How much is an appointment, is there a fee?

Cost is a big issue for me, so that’s mainly where my questions reside. Thank you.

Answer: Under the Affordable Care Act all preventative services, including reproductive health and birth control, are covered at no cost.  However, these services would be itemized on your fathers insurance explanation of benefits or EOB.  If you choose not to use your father’s private insurance, Family Planning deciphers a fee based on family size and income of the household.  However, FPA never refuses services based on your ability to pay.

Once you make an appointment, the visit itself is like an ordinary appointment at the doctors office.  The medical staff will take your blood pressure, height, weight and go over your medical history.  Then, you will be screened for pregnancy, chlamydia, gonorrhea and HIV.  After, you will speak with a nurse on what birth control options would be best for you.  Please call to schedule an appointment at 440-352-0608.

Can I get birth control if my tubes are tied?

Question: I have irregular menstrual cycles and my tubes are tied. Can I get in birth control to help regulate me?  I hate my body!

Answer: Yes, birth control is an option to help regulate menstrual cycles, even for women who have their tubes tied.  Please call us if you’d like to speak with a nurse or schedule an appointment. 440-352-0608

Do I have to wait until my next period to start birth control?

Question: Hello, I was wondering if I have to wait till I start my period next period to start my birth control.

Answer: You do not have to necessarily wait until your next period to start a hormonal birth control, but you will not be immediately protected from pregnancy. You have a few different options: (These options are for birth control pills)

Sunday Start- Take your first pill on the first Sunday during your period. Use a back-up method (Condoms) for 7 days.

First-day Start- Take your first pill on the first day of your next period.

Quick Start- Take your first pill while you are in our office (or that day at home). A back up birth control (condoms) should be used for 7 days. You will not get your period until you finish taking the active pills.

I’m not sure what type of birth control you are using (pills, NuvaRing, patch, etc) but if you have any questions please call Family Planning at 440-352-0608

 

How much are birth control pills and do I need an appointment?

Question: I’m only 16 and I need birth control pills. I have a job and am willing to pay for pills but I don’t want to involve my parents because they’d disagree and I probably wouldn’t get what I needed. How much would it be to get pills? Would I need an appointment? What other things would I have to provide?

Answer: Any new patient at Family Planning will need an appointment to get birth control.  Parents do not have to be involved in this process according to state law, but family involvement is always encouraged. The cost for birth control pills depends on a few factors. We accept private health insurance and Medicaid, but please keep in mind that if you use your parents’ insurance, they might be able to see “Family Planning” on their summary of services which is usually sent in the mail. If you do not want to use insurance, then the cost is based off a sliding fee scale that is determined by your income. Please call us to schedule an appointment.

Painesville: 440-352-0608 or Ashtabula: 440-992-5953

Which is better, the pill or the shot?

Question: Which is better, the pill or the shot?

Answer:  There are advantages and disadvantages to all methods of hormonal birth control.

Birth control pill:

  • Uses hormones (estrogen and progestin) to prevent ovulation
  • Efficacy: 92-99%
  • Take one pill a day at the same time
  • Advantages: Very effective when used correctly, can make menstrual cycle more regular and less painful
  • Disadvantages:  Need to remember to take daily, possible side effects due to estrogen, does not provide protection from sexually transmitted infections (STI) or HIV
  • Possible side effects: dizziness, nausea, headache, change in menstrual cycle, change in appetite, change in mood and although rare, possible chance of blood clots

The Shot:

  • The hormone progestin prevents ovulation
  • Efficacy: 97-99%
  • One shot every 3 months
  • Advantages: Each shot works for 12 weeks, no estrogen side effects, can be used while breast feeding
  • Disadvantages:  irregular menstrual cycles, does not provide protection from sexually transmitted infections (STI) or HIV
  • Possible side effects: headache, change in menstrual cycle, change in appetite, change in mood and in long time users, possible risk of decrease in bone mineral density

The best contraceptive choice depends on your medical history and personal goals.  I encourage you to call and make an appointment to discuss your options with our medical staff (440) 352-0608.

Do I need parental consent to start using birth control?

Question: Hi. I am 17 years old do I still need to get my parents ok to get the pill from u.

Answer:   Anyone 13 or older can schedule an appointment at Family Planning, with or without parental consent.  However, we always encourage the involvement of mom, dad or a general support system.

Please keep in mind, if you plan to use private insurance, your family may see Family Planning Services on their insurance invoice.

How do I change my birth control?

Question: I am switching from the depo shot to the birth control pills. My expiration date for my shot is February 10th, would I have to wait until then to start taking the birth control pills?

Answer:   You can take your first birth control pill up to 15 weeks after your last Depo injection.  However, I would suggest scheduling an appointment at Family Planning when you are due for your next Depo injection and discuss your options with the nurse.  Irregardless of what type of birth control you switch to, please use a back up method, such as condoms, during the first month.

How will the Affordable Care Act impact me?

Question: I’ve been kind of getting confused with the new Obama Care coming into play, and I’ve heard from peers that insurance companies will be required to give free birth control, is this true? Cause at the moment I don’t know if I’ll be able to afford the DeproVera shot or the Patch (I have blood clots, so I can’t be on the Pill) and my insurance company doesn’t cover much as it is. Can you please clarify the new birth control policies? Thank You

Answer:  The Affordable Care Act is going to impact everyone a little differently, depending on your insurance company and the plan you hold.  I would encourage you to contact your insurance agent or visit www.healthcare.gov to explore your options.  You can also call Family Planning, schedule an appointment and we can work with you and your insurance.  Either way, we can work with you to make sure you are able to receive the best birth control method for you.  However, the patch (OrthoEvra) might not be a great alternative if you are unable to use birth control methods with estrogen.  I would encourage you to call Family Planning 352-0608 and schedule an appointment to discuss progestin only birth control options.

Do I need to have a pelvic exam when switching birth control methods?

Question: When switching to a different type of birth control,(I’m currently on the shot) must I have to get an exam done?
Answer:  The answer depends on whether you are an active patient with Family Planning, what your age is, when your last pelvic exam was done and if you have any pelvic pain or concerns.  Either way, I would suggest that you call Family Planning, schedule an appointment and discuss your situation with our medical staff.

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